Analysis of cellular and molecular antitumor effects upon inhibition of SATB1 in glioblastoma cells.

The Special AT-rich Sequence Binding Protein 1 (SATB1) regulates the expression of many genes by acting as a global chromatin organizer. While in many tumor entities SATB1 overexpression has been observed and connected to pro-tumorigenic processes, somewhat contradictory evidence exists in brain tumors with regard to SATB1 overexpression in glioblastoma and its association with poorer prognosis and tumor progression. On the functional side, initial data indicate that SATB1 may be involved in several tumor cell-relevant processes.

For the detailed analysis of the functional relevance and possible therapeutic potential of SATB1 inhibition, we employ transient siRNA-mediated knockdown and comprehensively analyze the cellular and molecular role of SATB1 in glioblastoma.

In various cell lines with different SATB1 expression levels, a SATB1 gene dose-dependent inhibition of anchorage-dependent and -independent proliferation is observed. This is due to cell cycle-inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects of SATB1 knockdown. Molecular analyses reveal SATB1 knockdown effects on multiple important (proto-) oncogenes, including Myc, Bcl-2, Pim-1, EGFR, β-catenin and Survivin. Molecules involved in cell cycle, EMT and cell adhesion are affected as well. The putative therapeutic relevance of SATB1 inhibition is further supported in an in vivo tumor xenograft mouse model, where the treatment with polymeric nanoparticles containing SATB1-specific siRNAs exerts antitumor effects.

Our results demonstrate that SATB1 may represent a promising target molecule in glioblastoma therapy whose inhibition or knockdown affects multiple crucial pathways.

BMC cancer. 2017 Jan 03*** epublish ***

Anja Frömberg, Michael Rabe, Henry Oppermann, Frank Gaunitz, Achim Aigner

Rudolf-Boehm-Institute for Pharmacology and Toxicology, Clinical Pharmacology, University of Leipzig, Haertelstrasse 16 - 18, D-04107, Leipzig, Germany., Present address: Deptartment of Pediatrics, University Clinic Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany., Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany., Rudolf-Boehm-Institute for Pharmacology and Toxicology, Clinical Pharmacology, University of Leipzig, Haertelstrasse 16 - 18, D-04107, Leipzig, Germany. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..